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Precipitation of Energetic Electrons from the Earth’s Radiation Belt Stimulated by High-Power HF Radio Waves for Modification of the Midlatitude Ionosphere

Abstract : Based on the results of the experiments performed in 2005–2010 within the framework of the Sura—DEMETER program, we analyze the features of the precipitations of energetic electrons (with energies E ≈ 100 keV) from the Earth’s radiation belt. The modification of the ionospheric F2 region was conducted by means of high-power HF O-mode radio waves radiated in the CW regime. The precipitations were detected using the equipment onboard DEMETER, a French microsatellite. The conditions of precipitation appearance were determined, and it was found that the electron precipitation region was stretched along the geomagnetic meridian to a distance of 1300 km; the size of the region in the transverse direction is about 400 km. It was shown by ionosonde measurements that such precipitations lead to increased absorption of radio waves in the lower ionosphere. It is assumed that the mechanism for precipitation of electrons from the Earth’s radiation belt is determined by the interaction of energetic electrons with VLF radio waves, which are generated due to the interaction of the amplitude-unmodulated O-mode pump wave with the ionospheric plasma near the wave reflection height.
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https://hal-insu.archives-ouvertes.fr/insu-02906936
Contributor : Catherine Cardon <>
Submitted on : Sunday, July 26, 2020 - 3:56:10 PM
Last modification on : Friday, October 9, 2020 - 9:51:47 AM

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V. L. Frolov, A. D. Akchurin, I. A. Bolotin, A. O. Ryabov, Jean-Jacques Berthelier, et al.. Precipitation of Energetic Electrons from the Earth’s Radiation Belt Stimulated by High-Power HF Radio Waves for Modification of the Midlatitude Ionosphere. Radiophysics and Quantum Electronics, Springer Verlag, 2020, 62 (9), pp.571-590. ⟨10.1007/s11141-020-10004-4⟩. ⟨insu-02906936⟩

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