Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report: Present-day distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone relevant to climate and global atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

Audrey Gaudel 1 R. Cooper 1 Gérard Ancellet 2 Brice Barret 3 Anne Boynard 2 J. Burrows 4 Cathy Clerbaux 2 Pierre-François Coheur 5 Juan Cuesta 6 E. Cuevas 7 S. Doniki 5 Gaelle Dufour 6 F. Ebojie 8 Gilles Foret 6 O. Garcia 7 M. Granados Muños 9, 10 J. Hannigan 11 F. Hase 12 G. Huang 13 B. Hassler 1, 14 Daniel Hurtmans 5 D. Jaffe 15, 16 N. Jones 17 P. Kalabokas 18 B. Kerridge 19 S. Kulawik 9, 20 B. Latter 19 Thierry Leblanc 9 Eric Le Flochmoën 3 W. Lin 21 Jane Liu 22 X. Liu 13, 23 E. Mahieu 24 A. Mcclure-Begley 1 J. Neu 9 M. Osman 25, 26, 27 M. Palm 4 Hervé Petetin 3 I. Petropavlovskikh 1, 28 Richard Querel 29 N. Rahpoe 4 A. Rozanov 4 M. Schultz 30, 31 J. Schwab 32 R. Siddans 33 D. Smale 29 Martin Steinbacher 34 H. Tanimoto 35 D. Tarasick 36 Valérie Thouret 3 A. Thompson 37 T. Trickl 38 E. Weatherhead 1, 28 C. Wespes 5 H. Worden 39 C. Vigouroux 40 X. Xu 21 Guang Zeng 29 J. Ziemke 41
2 TROPO - LATMOS
LATMOS - Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales
Abstract : The Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) is an activity of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project. This paper is a component of the report, focusing on the present-day distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone relevant to climate and global atmospheric chemistry model evaluation. Utilizing the TOAR surface ozone database, several figures present the global distribution and trends of daytime average ozone at 2702 non-urban monitoring sites, highlighting the regions and seasons of the world with the greatest ozone levels. Similarly, ozonesonde and commercial aircraft observations reveal ozone’s distribution throughout the depth of the free troposphere. Long-term surface observations are limited in their global spatial coverage, but data from remote locations indicate that ozone in the 21st century is greater than during the 1970s and 1980s. While some remote sites and many sites in the heavily polluted regions of East Asia show ozone increases since 2000, many others show decreases and there is no clear global pattern for surface ozone changes since 2000. Two new satellite products provide detailed views of ozone in the lower troposphere across East Asia and Europe, revealing the full spatial extent of the spring and summer ozone enhancements across eastern China that cannot be assessed from limited surface observations. Sufficient data are now available (ozonesondes, satellite, aircraft) across the tropics from South America eastwards to the western Pacific Ocean, to indicate a likely tropospheric column ozone increase since the 1990s. The 2014–2016 mean tropospheric ozone burden (TOB) between 60˚N–60˚S from five satellite products is 300 Tg ± 4%. While this agreement is excellent, the products differ in their quantification of TOB trends and further work is required to reconcile the differences. Satellites can now estimate ozone’s global long-wave radiative effect, but evaluation is difficult due to limited in situ observations where the radiative effect is greatest.
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Submitted on : Friday, May 25, 2018 - 9:35:54 AM
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Audrey Gaudel, R. Cooper, Gérard Ancellet, Brice Barret, Anne Boynard, et al.. Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report: Present-day distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone relevant to climate and global atmospheric chemistry model evaluation. Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, University of California Press, 2018, 6 (1), pp.art: 39. ⟨10.1525/elementa.291⟩. ⟨insu-01799693⟩

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