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Extreme Morphogenesis and Ecological Specialization among Cretaceous Basal Ants

Abstract : Ants comprise one lineage of the triumvirate of eusocial insects and experienced their early diversification within the Cretaceous [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9]. Their ecological success is generally attributed to their remarkable social behavior. Not all ants cooperate in social hunting, however, and some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws [10]. Recent evolutionary studies predict that the early branching lineages of extant ants formed small colonies of ground-dwelling, solitary specialist predators [2, 5, 7, 11 and 12], while some Cretaceous fossils suggest group recruitment and socially advanced behavior among stem-group ants [9]. We describe a trap-jaw ant from 99 million-year-old Burmese amber with head structures that presumably functioned as a highly specialized trap for large-bodied prey. These are a cephalic horn resulting from an extreme modification of the clypeus hitherto unseen among living and extinct ants and scythe-like mandibles that extend high above the head, both demonstrating the presence of exaggerated morphogenesis early among stem-group ants. The new ant belongs to the Haidomyrmecini, possibly the earliest ant lineage [9], and together these trap-jaw ants suggest that at least some of the earliest Formicidae were solitary specialist predators. With their peculiar adaptations, haidomyrmecines had a refined ecology shortly following the advent of ants.
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Submitted on : Friday, May 27, 2016 - 9:27:16 AM
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Vincent Perrichot, Bo Wang, Michael s. Engel. Extreme Morphogenesis and Ecological Specialization among Cretaceous Basal Ants. Current Biology - CB, Elsevier, 2016, 26 (11), pp.1468-1472. ⟨10.1016/j.cub.2016.03.075⟩. ⟨insu-01322341⟩

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