New insights into the hydrological cycle from IASI δD distributions across the globe

Abstract : Because they have different vapour pressures, the different isotopologues of water (H2 16O and HDO) preferentially evaporate or condense during phase changes, leading to a fractionation of their ratio (δD). Numerous key processes of the hydrological cycle - such as convection, re-evaporation of hydrometeors, evapotranspiration, mixing - mark distinctly the isotopic ratio of the air masses. Observations of δD constitute therefore a useful constraint on the moistening/drying processes. IASI provide observations of δD in the free troposphere, after inversion of the measured radiances, at an unprecedented resolution. In this presentation, we illustrate the IASI capabilities to retrieve δD in the troposphere and show first distributions across the globe. The interest of these distributions is presented by analyzing the information contained in δD. For example, we show that the height of convection gives the water vapour a particular isotopic fingerprint which is of great interest to evaluate the representation of tropospheric mixing in climate models. We also present long term (6 years) time-series in the Northern Atlantic. The seasonal and inter-annual variations are interpreted with backward trajectory analyses and we show that the Saharan dynamic strongly influence the isotopic composition above the Atlantic Ocean through the formation of the Saharan Heat Low.
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal-insu.archives-ouvertes.fr/insu-01306507
Contributor : Catherine Cardon <>
Submitted on : Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 5:56:28 PM
Last modification on : Sunday, July 21, 2019 - 6:40:50 AM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : insu-01306507, version 1

Citation

Jean-Lionel Lacour, Camille Risi, Cyrille Flamant, Pierre-François Coheur, Cathy Clerbaux. New insights into the hydrological cycle from IASI δD distributions across the globe. 4th IASI International Conference, Apr 2016, Antibes Juan-Les-Pins, France. ⟨insu-01306507⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

458