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Thermodynamics of ions and water transport in porous media

Abstract : The thermodynamic framework of Prigogine, de Groot, and Mazur is extended to study the transport of ions and water in thermoporoelastic materials assuming infinitesimal deformations. New expressions are developed for the first and second principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics of multicomponent systems and a generalized power balance equation is derived. For porous materials, all the components cannot be treated on a symmetric basis. A Lagrangian framework associated with deformation of the solid phase is introduced and, in this framework, Curie's principle is used to set up the form of the linear constitutive equations describing the transport of ions, water, and heat through the pore network. The material properties entering these equations were recently obtained by Revil and Linde [J. Colloid Interface Science 302 (2006) 682–694] using a volume-averaging approach based in the Nernst–Planck and Stokes equations. This provides a way to relate the material properties entering the constitutive equations to two textural parameters characterizing the topology of the pore space of the material (namely the tortuosity of the pore space and the permeability). The generalized power balance equation is used to derive the linear poroelastic constitutive equations (including the osmotic pressure) to describe the reversible contribution of deformation of the medium in response to ions and water transport through the connected porosity.
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Submitted on : Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 11:28:45 AM
Last modification on : Saturday, October 3, 2020 - 3:19:41 AM

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André Revil. Thermodynamics of ions and water transport in porous media. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Elsevier, 2007, 307 (1), pp.254 à 264. ⟨10.1016/j.jcis.2006.10.074⟩. ⟨insu-00404343⟩

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