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Human impact and soil erosion during the last 5000 yrs as recorded in lacustrine sedimentary organic matter at Lac d'Annecy, the French Alps

Abstract : Sedimentary organic matter has been systematically studied in an eight-metre long core from the centre of the Petit Lac (Annecy, French Alps). The palynofacies composition identifies different terrestrial organic sources including forest floors, soil-horizons and geological substratum. The amount of recycled organic matter derived from the geological substratum is estimated and subtracted from the other contributions from the catchment area. The palynological record indicates that the relative variations in organic sources are directly dependent on human land-use. From ca. 5000 to 1700 BP, the human impact on soil cohesion is very low and organic matter is mainly exported from the surficial forest floor. The Roman invasion (ca. 1700 BP) marks the most important ecological and hydrological change. From 1700 to 900 BP, the clearing of forests released deeper-soil components. This trend is increased after 900 BP with agriculture intensification, which resulted in a higher sedimentation rate. In all the periods, extreme events such as flood or intensive run-off are characterised by notable increases of organic matter from surface (5000 to 1700 BP) and deep (1700 BP to now) soils.
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https://hal-insu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00089807
Contributor : Nathalie Pothier <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, August 23, 2006 - 2:53:51 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 3:50:37 AM

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Hervé Noël, Emmanuel Garbolino, Achim Brauer, Elisabeth Lallier-Vergès, Jacques-Louis de Beaulieu, et al.. Human impact and soil erosion during the last 5000 yrs as recorded in lacustrine sedimentary organic matter at Lac d'Annecy, the French Alps. Journal of Paleolimnology, Springer Verlag, 2001, 25, pp.2, 229-244. ⟨10.1023/A:1008134517923⟩. ⟨hal-00089807⟩

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